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Nouns

Welcome to LatinTests.net's interactive Grammar tables! These self-checking exercises test your knowledge of all the cases of Latin nouns, adjectives and pronouns.
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You can now fill out the parts of thrice as many words, by choosing one of three "sets" below. (Thanks to Alden Denny for his suggestion.)

  • Set One: puella; cibus; bellum; rex; litus; navis; mare; gradus; cornu; and spes
  • Set Two: casa; filius; verbum; pater; nomen; fons; animal; lacus; genu; and res
  • Set Three: poeta; ager; saxum; senex; opus; hostis; exemplar; manus; pecu; and dies

(The words in the nom. line of the tables below should change as you select different sets above. If they do not, please contact the webmaster.)

First and Second declension

Nouns

1st declension  2nd declension
feminine 1  masculine  neuter 
sg. nom. puella (girl)  cibus (food)  bellum (war) 
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Notes:

1 Almost all first declension nouns are feminine; exceptions include nauta (sailor), poeta (poet), and agricola (a farmer), which are masculine.
2 The vocative case of almost all nouns is the same as the nominative. The exceptions are second declension masculine nouns ending -us, which go to -e in the vocative (e.g. colonus → colone), and ending -ius, which go to -i (e.g. filius → filii).
3 The genitive singular of masculine nouns ending -ius and neuter nouns ending -ium is often contracted from -ii to -i, e.g. fili, ingeni.
4 Irregularities in second declension nouns:
  • deus (a god): nom. pl. dei or di; gen. pl. deorum or deum; abl. pl. deis or dis
  • vir, viri (man) has gen. pl. virorum or virum

Third declension

Nouns

Consonant-stem i-stem 4
Not neuter  Neuter  Not neuter  Neuter 
sg. nom. rex (king)  litus (shore)    mare (sea) 
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Notes:

  • 4 i-stem nouns have gen. pl. ending -ium instead of -um. Also note the abl. sg. of i-stem neuter nouns: -i instead of -e.
  • How to recognise an i-stem noun:
    • All nouns with nominative -is, e.g. navis, are i-stems.
    • Nouns with nominative ending in two consonants, e.g. fons, urbs, are i-stems (their original nominative was e.g. urbis).

Fourth and Fifth declension

Nouns

4th declension 5th declension 
masculine 5  neuter  feminine 6 
sg. nom. gradus (step)  cornu (horn)  spes (hope) 
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Notes:

  • 5 Most fourth declension nouns are masculine; manus (hand) is the only common feminine one. There are very few neuter fourth declension nouns; the only common one is cornu (horn or wing of an army)
  • 6 All fifth declension nouns are feminine, except for dies (day) which is masculine.
Vocabulary is taken from the Oxford Latin Course series.
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